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Arky
07-27-2007, 03:28 PM
We are a homeschooling family. I was just wondering if any other Sunshiners were homeschooling as well.

If anyone had questions about it, I might help answer them. So many times people think Homeschoolers are really weird. But we're pretty normal, it's just what we feel is best for our kids right now.

Any other Homeschoolers?????

chipndale
07-27-2007, 11:49 PM
My dd will start KIndergarten this year but I have given some thought to the whole idea of homeschooling. DH thinks that it would be too difficult to teach them as they get older. Does it take alot of time out of your day? Can you plan to take a day off and have school on Saturday or Sunday to make up for a off day?

cglaura
07-28-2007, 12:09 AM
Hi! My dd is 15 now and I've been homeschooling since day 1. At first I was very concerned with having the same curriculum and keeping on track with the schools, but then a lightbulb went off and I realized I was stressing way too much over that. After all, if I wanted her to be doing exactly what the school was doing she'd be in that school!

We are much more flexible now. For instance, Algebra was just not getting through, so we took it slowly, and she still does one lesson/day M-W for the summer. We do alot of literature based lessons, as opposed to text book read/q&a (except math).

I'm a single divorced mom whose ex lives across the country, so it's been a struggle sometimes. But with the flexibility, yes we skip days and just make them up/continue on.

I find now that she is getting into advanced stuff she is very self taught and anything I can't help with we ask at the library or some friends who are teachers.

I wouldn't change a thing I've done with her. She is very self sufficient and can get along with anyone from any age.

My motto is I want to teach her HOW to think...not WHAT to think. :)

I think the hardest thing is people know I work at home and homeschool, so they think I'm available to do whatever for them..watch a kid, pick something up, walk their dog! Like I sit around eating bon bons all day with nothing to do!

cglaura
07-28-2007, 12:19 AM
The Little Boy
by Helen B. Buckley

Once a little boy went to school

He was quite a little boy

And it was quite a big school

But when the little boy

Found that he could go in his room

By walking right in from the door outside,

He was quite happy

And the school did not seem

Quite so big any more.

One morning

When the little boy had been in school awhile,

The teacher said, “Today we are going to make a picture.”

“Good” thought the little boy.

He liked to make all kinds.

Lions and tigers,

Chickens and cows,

Trains and boats,

And he took out his box of crayons

And began to draw.

But the teacher said, “Wait, it is not time to begin!”

And she waited until everyone looked ready.

“Now,” said the teacher, “We are going to make flowers.”

“Good” thought the little boy.

He liked to make flowers.

And he began to make beautiful ones.

With pink and orange and blue crayons.

But the teacher said, “Wait and I will show you how.”

And it was red with a green stem.

“There,” said the teacher, “Now you may begin.”

The little boy looked at the teacher’s flower,

He looked at his own flower

He liked his flower better than his teacher’s

But he did not say this He just turned his paper over

And made a flower like the teacher’s.

It was red, red with a green stem.

On another day,

When the little boy had opened

The door from the outside all by himself,

The teacher said,

“Today we are going to make something with clay.”

“Good” thought the little boy

He liked clay.

He could make all kinds of things with clay,

Snakes and snowmen,

Elephants and mice,

Cars and trucks-

And he began to pull and pinch

His ball of clay

But the teacher said, “Wait! It is not time to begin.”

And she waited until everyone looked ready.

“Now,” said the teacher “We are going to make a dish.”

“Good” thought the little boy.

He liked to make dishes.

And he began to make some

That were all shapes and sizes.

But the teacher said, “Wait, and I will show you how.”

And she showed everyone how to make

One deep dish. “There,” said the teacher,

“Now you may begin.”

The little boy looked at the teacher’s dish

Then he looked at his own.

He liked his dishes better than the teacher’s

But he did not say this

He just rolled his clay into a big ball

And made a dish like the teacher’s.

It was a deep dish.

And pretty soon

The little boy learned to wait

And to watch

And to make things like a teacher

And pretty soon

He didn’t make things of his own anymore.

Then it happened

The little boy and his family

Moved to another house.

In another city

And the little boy

Had to go to another school.

This school was even bigger

Than the other one.

And there was no door from the

Outside into the room.

He had to go up some big steps

And walk down a long hall

To get to his room.

And the very first day

He was there

The teacher said, “Today we are going to make a picture.”

“Good” thought the little boy

And he waited for the teacher

To tell him what to do

But the teacher didn’t say anything

She just walked around the room.

When she came to the little boy

She said, “Don’t you want to make a picture?”

“Yes.” Said the little boy. “What are we going to make?”

“I don’t know until you make it.” Said the teacher.

“How shall I make it?” Asked the little boy.

“Why, anyway you like.” Said the teacher.

“If everyone made the same picture

And used the same color,

How would I know who made what,

And which is which?”

“I don’t know.”

Said the little boy

And he began to make a red flower

With a green stem.

Arky
07-28-2007, 08:56 AM
chipndale,

Homeschooling allows for a lot of flexibility. We do take a day off during the week and sometimes do school on weekends. I began homeschooling K with my oldest and he'll be in 5th grade this year. I chose to homeschool and wasn't sure how long it would last. I think experience has given me some confidence, but nearly every year I think about putting him in public school.

I used a literature based curriculum called Five in a row for K, 1st, and part of 2nd with each of my kids. The biggest struggle I had was getting out of the mentality that I have to do what they do at the public school. At the public school they have 20-30 kids with the teacher, I just have 1 or 2 or now 3. I can teach them in a different way.

Homeschooling is a challenge at time. It's also my kids education, I take it very seriously. But it is a joy as well. I love seeing the light bulb moments where the math finally clicks. I also love the fun we get to have together. I do love having the extra time with my kids.

speechteachri
07-28-2007, 09:00 AM
My dd is 10 now. We homeschooled for grades 1-4. Now my job has increased (I am a speech language pathologist for a local public school system) so she will be going to a local Christian School. I really wanted to homeschool for another 2 years, but I guess my timetable is not the same as the Bug Guy upstairs! I'm really going to miss it, and so is she, but sometimes you make the best choice you can at that point in time.

svwkirby
07-28-2007, 09:06 AM
I homeschool also. I did a little bit of the Five in a Row curriculum for Pre K with my now 7 year old, but after that switched to the K12 curriculum through Florida Virtual Academy. So I guess technically we are a public school family but schooling at home. In our family's eyes though we homeschool. My youngest starts kindergarten this year in the same program. Not sure how long I'll go...I'd like to get all the way through high school since the flexibility works for our family and I feel for my kids it will be a better education choice.

I will say this, our supplies for 2nd grade got delivered yesterday and the UPS man couldn't believe how excited the boys were over school stuff being delivered.

chipndale
07-28-2007, 11:04 AM
Wow, alot of you homeschool. I have another question about homeschooling. My dd missed K last year by 38 days - her birthday is October 8 and the school district we live in has a strict age policy. I checked into having her test into K but was told by several families that they had tried and if there is a doubt in anyones mind it would be a no go. And I was told that a doubt can be found in any chid without really looking. I just went last week for her K test and what a joke it was. She needed to know her name, age, address, phone number, basic colors, count to 10 and say her ABC's. The teacher did not know what to say when she asked how high she can count and my dd said 100 - "I can count by 1's, 5's or 10's. How would you like me to get there?" Then, my dd read the words around the room. By no means do I think my DD is gifted - I just think that she was ready for school last year and she is going to be bored and unstimulated this year. Her preschool teacher gave her alot of extra work to do because she already knew what they were doing. I have been told that the school will not do that. With homeschooling, if she completes a section of work quickly, can I just move on and would I be able to have her doing first grade stuff in a short period of time? Thanks for the imput.

Arky
07-28-2007, 01:25 PM
You have a smart little girl!;)

Most definitely you can move on to the next appropriate material for her learning abilities. Depending on your state will determine what you have to report. In Ohio, they requre notification at age 6 and detailed curriculum for the year. We moved here from NC which required to send in test scores from the previous year and letter of intent. Each state requires different things, some are more difficult than others.

For my boys (since I haven't officially started with my dd), they would probably be above grade level in many things. I have always kept them where the age would be with other kids ie my oldest is in 5th grade. Through homeschooling we have been able to go much more in depth on issues he loves like geography. My son knows 25 countries or so on each continent, well the ones there are that many. Not necessary for the elementary years, but he loved it and enjoyed learning it.

I don't focus on what grade level they're learning at, but that they are learning. That's the goal at my house. If it happened to be 2nd grade material when we were in 1st grade, so be it.

My DD bday is in Nov. She was ready for K last year too, but I didn't push it. One she is my baby. :o But also I had friends who had pushed ahead grade levels when the kids were young, but then try to keep them back later because they didn't want them in middle school or High school so young. I saw issues because they were suddenly a year behind their friends and that became an issue.

Homeschooling could definitely help with some of the issues you're talking about.

This is something I get pretty passionate about.:) Sorry if I gave too much info:rotfl: I feel homeschooling would fit with a lot more if given a little encouragement. If you have more questions, I'd be happy to help!!

Amy

faithhope
07-30-2007, 01:26 AM
I home school too...

I've just figured out all my curriculum for next year...5th grade and 1st grade. This will be my first year with two of them.

Home school rules are different for each state. I'm very blessed in that the rules for California are very lax. Just a letter once a year to the state.
I love being able to go at my kids pace... slow it down if they are having trouble understanding something, and speeding it up or skipping it, if they understand the concept already.

Rainbow Resource is a great cheaper way to buy some curriculums... just wanted to mention it in case it is news. I'll have to get my order in soon so I'll have my materials to start in September... the kids are anxious to get to work, my older one is already into her science electronics kit, and the younger one has already begged for math lessons.

Glad to know there is a few of us on this board. Some days it is hard being different.
Faith

speechteachri
07-30-2007, 08:52 AM
For anyone considering homeschooling who hasn't in the past...I would highly recommend that you join the Homeschool Legag Defense Fund before you have any dealings with your local school board. At least then if you have any difficulties you will be covered legally. Then abide by the local or state rules as best you can. This will save you lots of headaches. Also get help fro a homeschooling group in your area...most areas have them if you look.

One of the things I loved the best about homeschooling is that you can focus on mastery of topics at the child's own pace. They don't just go over it a few times and move on with everyone else whether they have learned the concept or not. That is definately a plus, because the kids have less "holes" in their learning later on.

When we homeschooled we started with ABeka, then moved to Sonlight because my dd is such and avid reader. One of the tinngs I am really not thrilled with about the school she will be attending is that they only read I think 3 novels during the year. A couple of them she has already read too. I hope the school will work with me on this. Using sonlight curriculum, my dd has been reading approximately 1 historically based novel every 2 weeks, so that will be a huge change.

Can you tell yet that I am not thrilled with sending her to school??:(

Chelley00
07-30-2007, 03:34 PM
Can I come play?

We homeschooled when the boys were younger then sent them to public school. Our DS11 has begged to be homeschooled again, so this year he's coming back home again for 6th grade. We had previously used Abeka, but this year are branching out to use a mix of Christian and classical curriculums. Should be fun :)

Arky
07-30-2007, 03:45 PM
For anyone considering homeschooling who hasn't in the past...I would highly recommend that you join the Homeschool Legag Defense Fund before you have any dealings with your local school board. At least then if you have any difficulties you will be covered legally. Then abide by the local or state rules as best you can. This will save you lots of headaches. Also get help fro a homeschooling group in your area...most areas have them if you look.


Can you tell yet that I am not thrilled with sending her to school??:(

Excellent advice about HSLDA!! I definitely second that.

:hugs: I know you are sad about the changes in schooling for your daughter. I will be praying for both of you through this transition. Remember too that reading can be purely for pleasure and doesn't have to be for school. You've done a great job raising and teaching your daughter - and it's not ending now. :hugs:

jnorth1007
07-30-2007, 04:43 PM
Question? Has anyone ever considered doing a homeschooling curriculum as a supplement to public school? I am so concerned about my DD who is starting Kindergarten. She loves to learn and I buy her workbooks all the time that she spends her extra time doing that deal with number and letter sequences, phonics and letter combinations. I worry that she won't be challenged enough. She did Abeka in her preschool and I was wondering if this is a program I could continue on a part time basis to supplement her education or if you think I will confuse her too much.

Arky
07-30-2007, 05:01 PM
Question? Has anyone ever considered doing a homeschooling curriculum as a supplement to public school? I am so concerned about my DD who is starting Kindergarten. She loves to learn and I buy her workbooks all the time that she spends her extra time doing that deal with number and letter sequences, phonics and letter combinations. I worry that she won't be challenged enough. She did Abeka in her preschool and I was wondering if this is a program I could continue on a part time basis to supplement her education or if you think I will confuse her too much.

Hmm, confuse her - depends on the child. Help her continue learning, most definitely. IMO, read to her, with her, long chapter books. That's where the child can see how much the world has to offer. I think reading to your child is one of the best things you can do.

I don't think I'd want my child to go to school all day and come home and do more of the same. But then, I have one who would literally do school all day every day because it's fun. So a lot depends on the child.

Consider Five in a Row. It's inexpensive - $20 for the book and then uses the library. It takes a story book and you read it every day for five days (hence the name). Then you do one topic a day that goes with the book. All of the suggestions are in the book which makes it easy if you're not very creative. But is a guideline not a set in stone, step by step thing.
For example, Ping is one of the books suggested. Monday we studied info about China and the Yangtze River. Tuesday we talk about the pictures - what did the artist use - colored pencils, water colors, etc. Can we try to make the duck look like he's moving? Wednesday, we talk about vocab words. Thursday maybe Science and buoyancy with water. Friday maybe a math activity.

I love Five in a Row. I think it would be a great fit for trying to do more after school too. It is not overly time consuming. Plus the kids are learning and they don't necessarily know it. :rotfl:

HTH!

jnorth1007
07-30-2007, 05:21 PM
Thank you for the suggestion. Callie is one of those kids who spends all of her free time trying to read, even though she can only sound out smaller words right now, or trying to write words by sounding out the letters. She works on the workbooks I got her all the time. This may change when she starts school but I really don't think it will. She constantly want to learn and this may be a way for me to work with her on this.

faithhope
07-30-2007, 08:38 PM
I "after schooled" my first kid through first and second grade, before I just pulled her out of school.

I think that to after school, you have to be very sensitive to the load. It will depend on the amount of homework that is given by the school. I did just little bits here and there during the school year... mostly via story books, books on tape and puzzle type workbooks, and games. During the summer I could do more school type curriculum with her and she didn't mind as long as we kept it short. In fact I HAD to keep feeding her need for knowledge since the school did not meet that need.

Take it day by day and don't set unrealistic goals, keep it fun... Board and card games can teach alot of math, and just reading story books from different countries and playing with globes and maps, can teach them geography without them even knowing it is a lesson. Don't forget field trips to local museums and parks too. Never seems like there are enough field trips in school.

Faith

dreamer13079
07-31-2007, 02:59 AM
I'm so glad this topic was introduced. I never thought of home schooling our kids until we sent my daughter to preschool last year. I got so stressed out by the letters sent home every week about the newest sickness to hit the class (lice, pink eye, strep throat, etc). I was also surprised at some of the things that my daughter was saying when she got home such as calling her brother a "baby" or a "faker" or advising me that although "damn it" was a bad word that Thor (interesting child in her class) told her that he was allowed to say it. AHH!!! I know that I can't protect my kids from everything but for god's sake if she picked this up from 2.5 hours 2 days a week, I can't imagine what she will pick up when she starts going full time.

I also love the idea of the kids being able to go at their own pace. Hmmm....
I will definitely be keeping up with this thread to read about all of the families who are making this choice now. I'm definitely considering it.